tankless water heaters
Tankless Water Heaters, Electric Tankless Heaters, Gas Boilers, Propane Water Heating Systems From Brands Like Rinnai, Bradford White and Rheem
water heating systems

Rinnai

All Indoor Liquid Propane and Indoor Natural Gas Tankless heater

Rinnai

All Outdoor Liquid Propane and Indoor Natural Gas Tankless heater

180,000 BTU Tankless Water Heater - PROPANE
RL75LSI-LP (REU-VC2528FFUD-US) INDOOR Luxury Series

MSRP: $1620.00 Sale Price:$1029.99

split heat pump

mini split ac unit
mitsubishi ductless system

indoor water heater
ductless mini split
180,000 BTU Tankless Water Heater NATURAL GAS
RL75LSE-N (REU-VC2528WD-US) OUTDOOR Luxury Series

MSRP: $1750.00 Sale Price:$1029.99

split heat pump

mini split ac unit
mitsubishi ductless system

mitsubishi split system
ductless mini split
   
180,000 BTU Tankless Water Heater NATURAL GAS
RL75LSI-N (REU-VC2528FFUD-US) INDOOR Luxury Series

MSRP: $1620.00 Sale Price:$1029.99

split heat pump

mini split ac unit
mitsubishi ductless system

indoor water heater
ductless mini split
180,000 BTU Tankless Water Heater - PROPANE
RL75LSE-LP (REU-VC2528WD-US) OUTDOOR Luxury Series

MSRP: $1750.00 Sale Price:$1029.99

split heat pump

mini split ac unit
mitsubishi ductless system

mitsubishi split system
ductless mini split
   
199,000 BTU Tankless Water Heater NATURAL GAS
RL94LSI-N (REU-VC2837FFUD-US) INDOOR Luxury Series

MSRP: $2150.00 Sale Price:$1229.99

split heat pump

mini split ac unit
mitsubishi ductless system

indoor 4 shower
ductless mini split
199,000 BTU Tankless Water Heater NATURAL GAS
RL94LSE-N (REU-VC2837WD-US) OUTDOOR Luxury Series

MSRP: $1980.00 Sale Price:$1249.99

split heat pump

mini split ac unit
mitsubishi ductless system

outdoor shower
ductless mini split
   
199,000 BTU Tankless Water Heater - PROPANE
RL94LSI - LP (REU-VC2837FFUD-US) INDOOR Luxury Series

MSRP: $2150.00 Sale Price:$1229.99

split heat pump

mini split ac unit
mitsubishi ductless system

indoor 4 shower
ductless mini split
199,000 BTU Tankless Water Heater - PROPANE
RL94LSE-LP (REU-VC2837WD-US) OUTDOOR Luxury Series

MSRP: $1980.00 Sale Price:$1249.99

split heat pump

mini split ac unit
mitsubishi ductless system

outdoor shower
ductless mini split
   
152,000 BTUTankless Water Heater NATURAL GAS
RU80I-N (REU-KB2530FFUD-US ) INDOOR Luxury Series

MSRP: $2380.00 Sale Price:$1259.99

split heat pump

mini split ac unit
mitsubishi ductless system

indoor water heater
ductless mini split
152,000 BTUTankless Water Heater NATURAL GAS
RU80E-N (REU-KB2530WD-US ) OUTDOOR Luxury Series

MSRP: $2250.00 Sale Price:$1259.99

split heat pump

mini split ac unit
mitsubishi ductless system

mitsubishi split system
ductless mini split
   
152,000 BTU Tankless Water Heater - PROPANE
RU80I-LP (REU-KB2530FFUD-US) INDOOR Luxury Series

MSRP: $2380.00 Sale Price:$1259.99

split heat pump

mini split ac unit
mitsubishi ductless system

indoor water heater
ductless mini split
152,000 BTU Tankless Water Heater - PROPANE
RU80E-LP (REU-KB2530WD-US) OUTDOOR Luxury Series

MSRP: $2250.00 Sale Price:$1259.99

split heat pump

mini split ac unit
mitsubishi ductless system

mitsubishi split system
ductless mini split
   
199,000 BTUTankless Water Heater NATURAL GAS
RU98I-N(REU-KB3237FFUD-US) INDOOR Luxury Series

MSRP: $1890.00 Sale Price:$1399.99

split heat pump

mini split ac unit
mitsubishi ductless system

indoor 4 shower
ductless mini split
199,000 BTUTankless Water Heater NATURAL GAS
RU98E-N (REU-KB3237FFUD-US) OUTDOOR Luxury Series

MSRP: $1860.00 Sale Price:$1399.99

split heat pump

mini split ac unit
mitsubishi ductless system

outdoor shower
ductless mini split
   
199,000 BTU Tankless Water Heater - PROPANE
RU98I-LP (REU-KB3237FFUD-US) INDOOR Luxury Series

MSRP: $1890.00 Sale Price:$1399.99

split heat pump

mini split ac unit
mitsubishi ductless system

indoor 4 shower
ductless mini split
199,000 BTU Tankless Water Heater - PROPANE
RU98E-LP (REU-KB3237FFUD-US) OUTDOOR Luxury Series

MSRP: $1860.00 Sale Price:$1399.99

split heat pump

mini split ac unit
mitsubishi ductless system

outdoor shower
ductless mini split
   
150,000 BTUTankless Water Heater NATURAL GAS
V65I-N (REU-VC2025FFU-US) INDOOR Luxury Series

MSRP: $2140.00 Sale Price:$789.99

split heat pump

mini split ac unit
mitsubishi ductless system

value series indoor
ductless mini split
120,000 BTUTankless Water Heater NATURAL GAS
V53E-N (REU-VAM1620W-US) OUTDOOR Luxury Series

MSRP: $1980.00 Sale Price:$689.99

split heat pump

mini split ac unit
mitsubishi ductless system

water system
ductless mini split
   
150,000 BTU Tankless Water Heater - PROPANE
V65I-LP (REU-VC2025FFU-US) INDOOR Luxury Series

MSRP: $2140.00 Sale Price:$789.99

split heat pump

mini split ac unit
mitsubishi ductless system

value series indoor
ductless mini split
180,000 BTU Tankless Water Heater - PROPANE
V53E-LP (REU-VAM1620W-US) OUTDOOR Luxury Series

MSRP: $1980.00 Sale Price:$689.99

split heat pump

mini split ac unit
mitsubishi ductless system

water system
ductless mini split
   
 
150,000 BTUTankless Water Heater NATURAL GAS
V65E-N (REU-VC2025W-US) OUTDOOR Luxury Series

MSRP: 1990.00 Sale Price:$739.99

split heat pump

mini split ac unit
mitsubishi ductless system

value series
ductless mini split
   
 
150,000 BTU Tankless Water Heater - PROPANE
V65E-LP (REU-VC2025W-US ) OUTDOOR Luxury Series

MSRP: $1990.00 Sale Price:$739.99

split heat pump

mini split ac unit
mitsubishi ductless system

value series
ductless mini split

Maxwell

Electric Tankless Water Heater 240 V /12kW Black -
$289 On Sale!

For Home, stores, business, warehouses, patios, pool showers, RV, camping etc.
maxwell heater
Electric Tankless Water Heater 240 V / 15 kW Silver w / Dots - $389 On Sale!
For Home, stores, business, warehouses, patios, pool showers, RV, camping etc.
maxwell heater
Electric Tankless Water Heater 240 V / 18 kW Black - $419 On Sale!
For Home, stores, business, warehouses, patios, pool showers, RV, camping etc.
maxwell heater
Electric Tankless Water Heater 240 V /21kW Silver - $469 On Sale!
For Home, stores, business, warehouses, patios, pool showers, RV, camping etc.
maxwell heater
Electric Tankless Water Heater 240 V /27kW Stainless Steel - $499 On Sale!
For Home, stores, business, warehouses, patios, pool showers, RV, camping etc.

     

What Are Tankless Water Heaters?

Tankless water heaters, also called instantaneous, continuous flow, inline, flash, on-demand or instant-on water heaters, are also available and gaining in popularity. These water heaters instantly heat water as it flows through the device, and do not retain any water internally except for what is in the heat exchanger coil.

Tankless heaters are often installed throughout a household at more than one point-of-use (POU), far from the central water heater or larger models may still be used to provide all the hot water requirements for an entire house. The main advantages of tankless water heaters are a continuous flow of hot water and energy savings (as compared to a limited flow of continuously heating hot water from conventional tank water heaters).

tankless water heaters
How tankless water heaters work
When there is a demand for hot water (e.g. a hot water tap is opened for a sink, shower, tub, or washing machine) the tankless water heater's water flow turbine senses the flow and starts the heating process. The water flow turbine sends a signal to the control board which looks at multiple factors: incoming water temperature, desired water temperature as set on the temperature controller, and the calculated difference between the two temperatures.
 
tankless water heaters Depending on the calculated incoming and desired water temperatures, the gas or electric flow into the burner assembly is modulated and the electronic ignition sequence begins. Water is heated to the desired temperature as it circulates through the copper heat exchanger providing continuous hot water. When the hot water tap is turned off, the tankless water heater shuts down and is placed in a standby mode pending the next call for hot water.
What is tankless water heater? See video below!
For Home, stores, business, warehouses, patios, pool showers, RV, camping etc.

 

Combination boilers

Combination or combi boilers, combine the central heating (CH) with (tankless) domestic hot water (DHW) in one box. They are not merely infinitely continuous water heaters having the ability to heat a hydronic heating system in a large house. When DHW is run off, the combi stops pumping water to the hydronic circuit and diverts all the boiler's power to instantly heating DHW. Some combis have small internal water storage vessels combining the energy of the stored water and the gas or oil burner to give faster DHW at the taps or increase the DHW flowrate

Combi boilers are rated by the DHW flowrate. The kW ratings for domestic units are 24 kW to 54 kW, giving approximate flowrates of 9 to 23 litres (2.4 to 6.1 US gal) per minute. There are larger commercial units available. High flowrate models will simultaneously supply two showers.
A further advantage is that more than one combi unit may be used to supply separate heating zones, giving greater time and temperature control, and multiple bathrooms. An example is one combi supplying the downstairs heating system and another the upstairs. One unit may supply one bathroom and one another. Having two units gives backup in case one combi is down, provided the 2 systems are connected with valves that are normally closed.
Installation cost is significantly lower and less space is required as water tanks and associated pipes and controls are not required. Combi boilers are highly popular in Europe, where in some countries market share is 70%. Combination boilers have disadvantages. The water flow rate is likely to be less than from a storage cylinder, particularly in winter. The power rating needs to be matched to heating requirements; heating water 'on demand' improves energy efficiency but limits the volume of water available at any moment. The water supply pressure must not be too low. It has been proposed that a flow regulator valve can control the amount of water used. Additionally, a combination boiler has more moving parts that can break down, so can be less reliable than a tank system.
Electric shower head

As the name implies, an electric heating element is incorporated into such shower head to heat the water as it flows. Invented in Brazil in the 1930s and widely used since the 40s, the electric shower is a home appliance very commonly used in South American countries due to the higher costs with gas canalization. At one time, an electric shower cost less than a hair dryer. Electric Showers work like a coffee maker, but with a larger water flow. When the water flows inside, the pressure inflates a diaphragm which closes the electrical contacts of the heater coil with the live contacts, turning on the device. Once the water is stopped, the device turns off automatically. An ordinary electric shower used to have three heat settings: low (2.5 kW), high (5.5 kW) or cold (0 W) to use when a central heater system is available or in hot seasons.

The power consumption of electric showers in the maximum heating level is about 5.5 kW for 120 V and 7.5 kW for 220 V. The lower costs with electric showers compared to the higher costs with boilers is due to the time of use: an electric shower uses energy only during the bath, while a boiler works many times a day to keep a larger quantity of water hot for use throughout the day. So electric showers can save energy compared to gas central heaters. A 20 minute bath by an electric shower can cost about US$0.10, but the same bath using water from a gas heater can cost three times as much. This difference can be larger where the electricity is cheaper than the gas supply or in tropical countries where the maximum power consupmtion is required only during the cold seasons. There is a wide range of electric showers all with various amounts of heating controls. tankless water heaters

The heating element of an electric shower is made from a coil made of nickel or an alloy of nickel and chromium or can even be made of sheathed heater element, like the ones used in oil heaters, radiators or irons - they provide more safety as there is insulation between the electric parts and the water. Due to electrical safety Standards, modern electric showers are made of plastic instead of the metallic casings like in the past. As an electrical appliance which works with higher electrical currents than a washer or a dryer machine, the installation of electric showers needs careful planning and must be made directly from the electrical distribution box, with exclusive 6 mm wires, electric connectors for 50 A and a ground system. A poorly installed system with old aluminium wires or bad connections are very dangerous as the wires can overheat. Some changes in the electrical public distribution were important before a wide use of electric showers at first. Electric public transformers with higher KVA capacity are required due to the increase of the electrical demand. In countries where almost all houses use electric showers like Brazil, an ordinary street transformer per square have 112.5 to 150 kVA of capacity and buildings must have their own transformers to support the electrical domestic demand without overloads in the electric distribution.

Various types and their advantages

Point-of-use tankless water heaters are located right where the water is being used, so the water is almost instantly hot, which saves water. They also save even more energy than centrally installed tankless water heaters because no hot water is left in the pipes after the water is shut off. However, point-of-use tankless water heaters are usually used in combination with a central water heater since they are usually limited to under 6 litres/minute (1.5 U.S. gallons/minute), as the expense of buying a heater for every kitchen, laundry room, bathroom, or sink can outweigh the money saved in water and energy bills. In addition, in the USA point of use water heaters until recently were almost always electrical[citation needed], and electricity is often substantially more expensive than natural gas or propane. Tankless heaters can ideally be somewhat more efficient than storage water heaters.

In both kinds of installation (centralized and POU) the absence of a tank saves energy as conventional water heaters have to reheat the water in the tank as it cools off, called standby loss. There is a misconception that the energy lost by a tanked heater stored inside a home merely helps to heat the home. This is true of an electric unit, but for a gas unit some of this wasted energy leaves through the exhaust vent. However, if the building needs to be cooled to maintain normal temperatures this results in a loss in efficiency. With a central water heater of any type, water is wasted waiting for water to heat up because of the cold water in the pipes between the faucet and the water heater. tankless water heaters

In both kinds of installation (centralized and POU) the absence of a tank saves energy as conventional water heaters have to reheat the water in the tank as it cools off, called standby loss. There is a misconception that the energy lost by a tanked heater stored inside a home merely helps to heat the home. This is true of an electric unit, but for a gas unit some of this wasted energy leaves through the exhaust vent. However, if the building needs to be cooled to maintain normal temperatures this results in a loss in efficiency. With a central water heater of any type, water is wasted waiting for water to heat up because of the cold water in the pipes between the faucet and the water heater.

This water waste can be avoided if a recirculating pump is installed, but at the cost of electricity to run the pump and wasted energy to heat the water circulation through the pipes. Tankless water heaters can be divided into two categories: "full on/full off" and "modulated". Full on/full off units do not have a variable power output level; the unit is either fully on or completely off. Modulated tankless water heaters base the heat output on the flow of water running through the unit. This is usually done through the use of a flow sensor, modulating gas valve, inlet water temperature sensor and an outlet water temperature sensor-choke valve and means that the occupants should receive the same output temperature of water at differing velocities, usually within a close range of 2 C. The high-efficiency condensing combination boiler provides both space heating and water heating, an increasingly popular choice in UK houses.

In fact, combination boilers now account for over half of all the new domestic boilers installed in Britain. Under current North American conditions, the most cost effective configuration from an operating viewpoint is usually to use a central tankless water heater for most of the house, and install a point of use tankless water heater at any distant faucets or bathrooms. However, this may vary according to how much electricity, gas and water costs in the area, the layout of the house, and how much hot water is used. Only electric tankless water heaters were available at first and they are still used for almost all point of use heaters,

but natural gas and propane heaters are now common. When consumers are considering a whole house gas tankless unit, they are advised to look at how the unit functions when raising the water temperature by about 42 C (75-77 F). Thus, if they live in a cold weather climate, they are advised to look at the unit's capacity with 3-10 C (38-50 F) inlet water temperatures, and find a size that produces approximately 15 litres/minute (4 gpm) even in winter if they have a typical-sized house and desire what is called a 2-appliance heater. This same unit may produce 25-30 litres/minute (6.3-6.9 gpm) in summer with higher inlet temperatures, but there is greater interest in year round production and usability.

 

Advantages
Long term energy savings: Although a tankless water heater might cost more initially it may result in both energy and cost savings in the long term. As water is heated only when it is needed, there is no storage of hot water. With a tank, water is kept warm all day even if it never gets used and heat loss through the tank walls will result in a continual energy drain. Even in homes or buildings with a high demand for hot water, a tankless water heater may provide some level of savings. In a typical home these savings are quite substantial. If instant hot water at the taps at limited hours is a priority, a recirculation system similar to those in the tank-type systems can be accommodated by using an aquastat and timer in order to decrease the added heat loss from the recirculation system. It has to be said though that if the storage tank is highly-insulated-a few tanks are available with excellent levels such as 100 mm or more polyurethane foam-the savings become minimal. For one consumer-grade electric storage water heater, the surface temperature was less than 1 C higher than the air temperature.
Unlimited hot water: As water is heated while passing through the system an unlimited supply of hot water is available with a tankless water heater. Although flow rate will determine the amount of hot water that can be generated at one time it can be generated indefinitely. However, this can also be a disadvantage as running out of hot water self-limits use while a tankless heater has no such limit.
Less physical space: Most tankless water heaters can be mounted on a wall or even internally in a building's structure. This means less physical space has to be dedicated to heating water. Even systems that can't be mounted on walls take up less space than a tank-type water heater. tankless water heaters
Reduced risk of water damage: No stored water means there is no risk of water damage from a tank failure or rupture, although the risk of water damage from a pipe or fitting failure remains. Improper piping in either the hot or cold water lines to the tankless water heater can result in water damage though.
Temperature compensation A temperature compensating valve tends to eliminate the issue where the temperature and pressure from tankless heaters decrease during continuous use. Most new generation tankless water heaters stabilize water pressure and temperature by a bypass valve and a mixing valve which is incorporated in the unit. Modern Tankless are not inversely proportional, because they will regulate the amount of water that is created and discharged, therefore stabilizing water temperature by utilizing a flow control valve. Flow speed is not the issue, but change in temperature is the important issue to address. The wider the temperature rise, the less flow you receive from the unit. The smaller the temperature rise, the more flow you receive. The flow control valve in conjunction with thermistors, maintains a stable temperature throughout the use of the unit.
 
Installing a Tankless Water Heating System
Manufacturer's recommend you have a qualified contractor install your water heater. The tankless systems require a lot of energy when they are operating and most existing homes are not capable of supporting them without modifications and upgrades to their electrical or gas systems.
Installation of a dedicated circuit is a minimum requirement for electric tankless systems. Heavier gauge wiring for the circuit to the tankless heater is also commonly recommended.
Modification to existing gas venting systems is often necessary to meet the demands of the gas heaters used in tankless systems.
Tips & Warnings
Switching to tankless water heating requires preparation on your part. You need to evaluate how and when your family uses hot water. Most tankless water heater manufacturer's web sites provide information on typical water consumption that you can use to determine specifically how you use hot water and estimate your family's unique requirements.
While tankless systems are becoming more common, there are still many contractors who aren't familiar with them and their specialized installation requirements. Be sure the contractor you choose is manufacturer certified. tankless water heaters
If your water supply is from a well (rather than a municipal system) check your water flow rate to ensure it can keep up with the ongoing water demand
If the fact that you can't run out of hot water means you will take longer showers, you could end up actually using more energy and not reaping any of the benefits from switching to a tankless system.
 
Know More With Diagrams
tankless water heaters
tankless water heaters
tankless water heaters
tankless water heaters

tankless water heaters

Selecting a Tankless Water Heater

Before buying a Tankless Water Heater, consider the following:

Fuel Type
Location, Size and Demand
Application
Fuel Type
The first thing that you'll need to decide when selecting a Tankless Water Heater is the fuel type. You will need to select between an Electric Tankless Water Heater (like Eemax Tankless Water Heaters or Stiebel Eltron Tankless Water Heaters) or a Gas-Fired Tankless Water Heater (like Rheem Tankless Water Heaters).

If you plan to purchase an Electric Tankless Water Heater, consider the Electrical Requirements:

Voltage

Amperage

Circuit Breaker

tankless water heaters

Voltage

Many retailers sell units that will accommodate 110V, 120V, 208V, 220V, 240V, and 277V.

Amperage

Different Electric Tankless Water Heaters will have various requirements in amp draw. You will want to ensure that you can support the electrical demands of your Electric Tankless Water Heater.

Circuit Breaker

You must ensure that you have a circuit or circuits that will support your Electric Tankless Water Heater. It may be necessary to put your Electric Tankless Water Heater on its own circuit or circuits.

You should consult with a qualified, licensed electrician for more information.

If you plan to purchase a Gas-Fired Tankless Water Heater, consider the Gas-Type and Venting Requirements:
tankless water heaters

You will first need to identify whether your gas type is Natural Gas or Propane. It is imperitive that you examine your current gas line to ensure that it will meet the requirments of your new Gas-Fired Tankless Water Heater.

The requirements of the Tankless Water Heater may exceed that of your existing tank-style water heater. Next, you will need to consider venting requirements for your specific installation scenario. There are a few important things to keep in mind when purchasing the gas venting accessories for your Gas-Fired Tankless Water Heater.

Be sure that you purchase Category III stainless steel (UL1738 certified) venting for your Gas-Fired Tankless Water Heater. "Type B" venting accessories are not acceptable. Also, be sure to check local building code to ensure that your specific needs will be completely met.

Additionally, many Tankless Water Heater manufacturers offer gas venting "kits". It is recommended that customers evaluate the needs of their specific installation to ensure that they will be getting all of the necessary gas venting accessories. Depending on where you will be installing the Tankless Water Heater, a pre-made kit will probably not meet your needs. Ensure that you measure out the vent route and consider where the discharge will go through the wall or ceiling, consider the necessary clearances, and consider ample access to air for combustion, then buy the appropriate gas venting pieces. *Note: Gas-Fired Tankless Water Heaters may still require a minimal electrical connection. Be sure to review installation requirements for the units you are considering for purchase.

Location, Size, and Demand
When deciding which Tankless Water Heater to purchase, you will also need to consider where you will need hot water. Are you looking for a unit that will heat the water at one bathroom sink (single point application), an entire bathroom (multipoint application), or an entire house, apartment, or condo (whole house application)? It is important to recognize the number of fixtures that will require hot water. Each fixture will have its own demands. The chart below illustrates the typical flow rates (demand) for some standard fixtures:
tankless water heaters

The flow rate is especially important, since Tankless Water Heaters will generate a temperature rise based on the flow rate demanded.

For example, a Stiebel Eltron Tempra 12, running on 240 Volt power, will raise the water temperature by 54F at 1.5 gpm, 36F at 2.25 gpm, and 27F at 3.0 gpm, above the ambient incoming water temperature, up to 125F.

A larger unit, like the Stiebel Eltron Tempra 36, running on 240 Volt power, will raise the water temperature by 92F at 1.5 gpm, 92F at 2.25 gpm, and 82F at 3.0 gpm, above the ambient incoming water temperature, up to 125F.

Next, you should look at your ambient incoming water temperature. If you live in a cold climate, like New York, your incoming water temperature will likely be much lower than if you live in a warm climate, like Florida. Your best bet is to find out how much temperature rise you will need in order for your hot water to reach the desired heat. If the ambient incoming water temperature for your shower is 65F, you are using a 2.0 gpm shower, and you want to raise that temperature to 115F, you will want to look for a Tankless Water Heater that will provide at least a 50F temperature rise at 2.0 gpm (115F - 65F = 50F). However, if you anticipate additional simultaneous demand, such as the hot water from a sink being used while someone is showering, you will need to add the sink's gpm to the shower's gpm in order to determine your overall gpm demand and then find the temperature rise necessary to meet your overall needs.
Application

You may have a specific application in mind for your Tankless Water Heater.Here are a few examples of the different models and their functionality for a specific application:

Electric Point of Use Tankless Water Heaters

A single point application is one where only one fixture will require an Electric Tankless Water Heater. Here are some examples of Electric Point of Use Tankless Water Heaters:

Eemax Single Point Electric Tankless Water Heaters

Stiebel Eltron Point of Use Electric Tankless Water Heaters Chronomite Instant-Flow SR Electric Tankless Water Heaters Eemax Flow Controlled The "Flow Controlled" range of water heaters from Eemax are ideally suited to serve two points, like two sinks, in close proximity. Here is an example of Flow Controlled Electric Tankless Water Heaters: Eemax Flow Controlled Electric Tankless Water Heaters

Thermostatic The Thermostatic Tankless Water Heater

serves as a booster for temperature loss from long pipe runs, dishwashers and sanitation. Thermostatic units are good for applications where precise temperature control is essential; such as schools, hospitals and laboratories. Here are some examples of Thermostatic Electric Tankless Water Heaters: Eemax Thermostatic Electric Tankless Water Heaters Stiebel Eltron DHC-E 8 Electric Tankless Water Heater Stiebel Eltron DHC-E 10 Electric Tankless Water Heater

Eemax Series Two

Eemax Series Two units are ideally suited for residential showers, entire bathrooms, smaller houses, condos, summer cabins and apartments. They will also accommodate industrial boosters, higher flow rate applications such as wash down stations and higher flow rate accurate temperature control applications such as photo labs. Here is an example of Eemax Series Two Electric Tankless Water Heaters:

Eemax Series Two Electric Tankless Water Heaters Whole House Indoor Use Larger Whole House units are designed to serve an entire house, apartment, condo, or cabin, where multiple points of use will exist. Here are some examples of Whole House Electric Tankless Water Heaters for Indoor use: Eemax EX280T2T Series Three Electric Tankless Water Heater Stiebel

Eltron Tempra Series Electric Tankless Water Heaters Rheem Indoor Gas Tankless Water Heaters Whole House Outdoor Use Larger Whole House units are designed to serve an entire house, apartment, condo, or cabin, where multiple points of use will exist. Here are some examples of Whole House Electric Tankless Water Heaters for Outdoor use: Rheem Outdoor Gas-Fired Tankless Water Heaters

 

FAQS
What's the biggest benefit of a tankless over a tank type heater?

The time it takes for hot water to arrive at the tap is the same on both types. The best thing about the hot water that comes from a tankless model is that you will receive an endless supply of hot water for as long as you open a faucet. With traditional tank type water heaters, you have hot water until the hot water tank's supply is depleted. Then you must wait for the storage tank of cold water to re-heat before you again have hot water.So...

If you are running out of hot water with your current tank type heater, and are thinking of purchasing a tankless model, you may wish to conduct a simple test by keeping track of the amount of time from when you turn on the hot water to the moment the hot water runs out. Take the total capacity of your tank-type heater. (This information can usually be found on the information stickers on the side of the tank.) Divide the capacity of the tank type heater (in gallons) by the number of minutes that it takes to run out of hot water. This is your peak usage of hot water and this calculation should be the minimum GPM that you need when selecting a tankless heater.

To perform this test, the home owner must decide which hot water devices to run for this test as the more valves open the higher the total GPM will be. So, if you have two showers and sometimes they are in use when the hot water runs out, then this would be the ones to use for the test.

For example: If your test results in your 40 gallon heater running out of hot water in 12.5 minutes. Use the equation, G M = GPM, where G is equal to the total Number of Gallons of your tanked water heater and M is equal to the total time the water was running before it went cold. To be accurate in your calculation it is recommended that you wait an hour before running your hot water, only to make sure that your hot water heater is full of hot water. 40 gallon water capacity divided by 12.5 minutes = a flow rate of 3.2 gallons per minute.

Is this water heater technology new?

No. In fact the technology is now considered "mature". Mature means that the device has been determined to be developed to the point that it is considered reliable and that drastic changes to the components of the device in the near future are unlikely. However: If you think you know about tankless heater technology or someone you know is giving you advice about a tankless heater, if your knowledge is ten years or even five years old, you are probably misinformed.

Even though they have been around for a long time, today's tankless heaters are not the same as those from only a few years ago. All manufacturers have made improvements in this product line and these heaters are now much more efficient, consume far less energy and are much safer and easier to operate. You are reading one of the largest and most informative unbiased databases on this technology available anywhere. Do yourself a favor and take the time to review everything in this faqs page.

Even if you buy one of our competitor's products, you will be doing so as a wise and informed consumer with the confidence necessary to make an intelligent decision. Tankless water heaters have been around for over 100 years. During World War II, conserving water and energy became a serious concern and the popularity of tankless heaters increased ten-fold. Since that time period, tankless hot water heaters have become a standard fixture in homes and businesses the world over. Adults in Europe and Asia know of no other method to heat water. Tank type heaters are very old technology. Primitive cave-people heated water in a clay pot over a fire and a tank type water heater is actually an improved version of this method. Modern tankless models heat water in the most efficient manner possible.

Most people use hot water only in the morning and the evening. The remainder of the time, the tank model is slaving away cooking the tank of water and keeping it at the correct temperature setting so that the people in the house can have hot water when they need it. In the modern world, a tankless heater provides hot water whenever it is needed and no energy is wasted by constantly heating water held in a big tank. Energy costs are unlikely to go down in the future.

It makes perfect sense to change to a tankless heater. When a new heater is required, that is the perfect time to make the switch. It is predicted that within a few years, many USA states will require tankless heaters in all new home construction.

Does a tankless water heater have a pilot light?
Some do and some don't. Every tankless water heater from EZtankless.com has an electronic ignition. This means you can save even more money when comparing them to a tank type water heater. As there is no open flame, you do not have to try to re-ignite the pilot or even worry about it.
My water heater is almost worn out and it is twenty years old. Recently it has been malfunctioning and I am thinking about getting a new tankless model, is it a good idea to switch now?

We see no reason to cling to the old inefficient heater design. The USA is the last remaining western culture on Earth using tank type heaters. The rest of the world has been using tankless heaters for many years and know nothing but that method.

It is time that we learn from the rest of the world. We must change our wasteful ways and this is a step in the right direction. We would never leave our car running for days at a time just to keep the engine warm in case we need to drive somewhere or keep our oven on 24 hours a day just to prepare food when we decide we are hungry.. Why do we constantly heat a large tank of hot water? If our society replaced the tank type heaters with tankless models, we would dramatically reduce our nation's gas consumption. When we upgrade to a tankless, we can save a substantial amount on our energy bill.

What is the life expectancy of a Tankless Water Heater?

Depending on your usage, the type of installation, and the quality of your water, they can last from 15 to 25 years. With optimal water quality and a quality installation a tankless water heater should have no problem lasting 20 years or more. With periodic cleaning, and proper maintenance, our tankless water heaters can last significantly longer than a traditional tank heater. This technology is reliable as these heaters have been well developed and tested in all climates for long periods by millions of homeowners in Europe and Asia.

Modern tankless heaters are manufactured with the highest quality standards and put through rigorous testing and quality control. Before packaging and shipment to our warehouse here in the USA, all of our units have passed several quality control test procedures.

I have been told that tankless units are unreliable. Will it break down frequently?
If someone you know is giving you advice about a tankless heater, if their knowledge is ten years or even five years old, they are probably misinformed. Reliability, safety and comfort are the best words to describe the performance of today's modern tankless water heater. There have been rumors circulating in the past, but the technology has advanced dramatically in the past few years.
How do your water heaters compare to other models from other manufacturers?

Our heaters are built by a leading manufacturer in this field. They have been producing these for decades and they build millions of them each year. These units are used in all countries in Europe and Asia as well as Australia, South and Central America. Our models are specifically designed to be used with our USA A/C electrical current and our natural and LP gas. (As well as our electric models)

We are confident you will like our quality water heater. We have tested them here in our USA Indiana warehouse and have actually installed them in our own homes, and the homes of friends, neighbors and family. There are more expensive ones on the market, and there are cheaper ones. The construction and the quality of the components that go inside is what separates the good ones from the bad ones. Like the old saying; (You get what you pay for.)

What size tankless water heater is best for my needs?

You must first determine the needs of the home or business. These needs must be compared to the GPM capacity of the water heater being purchased. How many people are showering and at what time? Is there a specific time when more people are typically bathing? When is the washing machine, or dishwasher in use? Are these machines needed at the same time family members are bathing or showering? (Most families are familiar with using appliances that consume hot water. Typically they do not operate them in time periods when bathing and showering are required.) Is there a large hot tub, spa, or whirlpool?

Is it used in a time period when the washing machine or dishwasher is running? Remember, tankless water heaters never run out of hot water. What is important is the total gallons per minute required during peak usage. Finally, establish a reasonable "peak demand" flow estimate in GPM. (Gallons Per Minute). This is done by adding up the flow rates of all hot water consuming appliances, faucets and showerheads that may be in use at one time.

NOTES: (Please keep in mind that part of operating a more efficient home is the sensible use of energy and other natural resources. No different than recycling paper, glass, aluminum and plastic requires more effort than simply throwing everything into a trash bin, saving energy and natural resources requires a change of habit and honest economizing efforts on behalf of all members of a family.

Do this and true energy savings and satisfying environmental results are easily seen by the residents of the home. Does your home have low flow water saver plumbing fixtures? Water saving shower heads consume much less than those of the past. Tankless heaters can be used without modern faucets and shower heads, but does this make sense? When using water-saver plumbing fixtures in combination with a tankless water heater, a family can enjoy the same comforts while consuming less energy and water. Additionally, there is the added benefit of saving money on utility bills.

Will a tankless water heater save us money on our utility bills? If so, how much money will it save us?

Most people will see an actual savings on the utility bill. There are variables that may reduce how much is saved. For instance, as the user will never run out of hot water, that person may take much longer showers. This practice will probably cut into the savings. The cost of electricity, LP gas and natural gas varies widely across the USA and this will affect the amount of money saved. The higher the cost for the energy used to heat water, the quicker recovery of the initial cost of installing a tankless versus tank style water heater. Generally speaking, most manufacturers claim as much as 25% to 50% savings, depending on what type of energy the tankless water heater uses. i.e. City gas, bottle gas (LP), or electricity. Because of these variables, we are reluctant to make statements or promises on actual savings. Simple common sense tells us that these modern technologies will save energy and thusly money. And of course, we are not wasting energy which is good for our planet.

A reminder about direct-vent technology: Remember that in addition to the safety features, a modern direct-vent tankless model does not use room air for combustion, therefore it is not extracting heated or air conditioned air from your home. Buy using outside air for combustion, these balanced dual-chamber direct-vent models saving even more energy. Older tankless heaters that use room air for combustion are extracting the heat from the home. In the past, this factor was not usually taken into consideration. If a person wouldn't leave a window open in the winter, why would they want a tankless heater to be sucking the heat out of the home? In fact, tank type heaters also extract heat from the home.

Why does a tankless water heater save money on utility bills and what is the payback period?

Tank type water heaters typically lose about 3% or 4% of their heat every hour and they run 24/7. Tankless water heaters heat water only when the faucet is turned on.

With a tankless water heater, there is no standby heat loss. A tankless heater only uses energy when it is making hot water that is being used at the same time. The payback period for a tankless water heater is typically three to seven years depending on how much hot water is used and the cost of energy in the area where the unit is installed. (The smaller the quantity of hot water that is used, the faster the payoff period will be realized.) For a single person living alone who is seldom at home and using hot water, the energy bill reflects the low consumption because tankless water heaters DO NOT EXPERIENCE STANDBY HEAT LOSS. Additionally, the user is contributing to protecting the planet as well as the future of fuel and fresh water supplies for us all.

How much money does a Tankless water Heater cost?

Tankless water heaters vary in price and quality. There are less expensive models for summer homes, small apartments, and cabins. Deluxe whole house models are more expensive because they are made to heat water for much larger consumption needs.

The installation costs are not something that we can determine as there are a number of installation variations. However, most manufacturers charge extra for the exhaust components. Our heaters come with the basic exhaust/intake components at no additional charge.

(This can save as much as $250.00 or more)* Some installations are simple and some are more complex. We recommended that a person who is contemplating a tankless heater first speak to a contractor/plumber to assess the potential costs for the proposed installation.

I have a fairly large home; do I need more than one tankless water heater?

Our large model on-demand tankless water heaters are designed for an entire home. Our smaller units can provide hot water for a small home, or summer cabin with lower GPM needs. If necessary, our heaters can be linked together to provide higher GPM output levels.

To answer your question specifically, we must ask you: How many gallons of hot water do you actually need for your home? Here are some helpful tips for you to consider:

1. How much hot water (in GPM) do you use at one time? A standard shower head, dishwasher, washing machine is about 2.5 gallons per minute each. (Low flow shower and faucet heads use substantially less water. For example, a low flow shower head may use only 1.5 GPM.) If you typically use all three of these fixtures at the same time, that would require approximately 4.5 to 7.5 gallons per minute. Bath tubs are sometimes as high as six to eight gallons per minute, and rain head showers and body sprays definitely require more hot water than a standard shower head. So if your demand for hot water is higher than the typical home you will need a larger sized unit or another identical unit connected as a pair.

2. Remember to pick the right size unit for realistic situations rather than for your current situation. For example if you have three showers in your home, but you only use one, you might think the smallest unit is plenty for your situation. But if you have visiting guests for the holidays or if you sell your home, the hot water demand may be different and the heater may be too small.

3. Here's the most important tip to understand. Ultimately, a tankless water heater's gallon per minute (GPM) output depends on your tap water's temperature. Simply put, the colder the ground water temperature the less output you will get from the tankless heater. This is because the colder tap water temperature requires the heater to heat the water more than if it was heating water that is warmer. We recommend choosing your heater based on your winter season's worst case scenario tap water temperature. This way you are covering for the lowest temperature you will experience in your area (We recommend that you consult your local plumber or contractor as they will know the ground water temperatures from prior experience and will help you with the calculations for final application sizing).

Can I use my existing venting for my tankless water heater? If not, why not?

Generally speaking the answer is always NO. Absolutely not. Why? There are a few important things to keep in mind when purchasing the gas venting for your Gas-Fired Tankless Water Heater.

(1) By code, tankless water heaters must use Category III stainless steel exhaust venting. Category III venting is corrosion resistant and has gas tight sealed joints. The venting must be corrosion resistant because a slightly acidic condensation is formed during combustion. This condensation can eat away at your current vent pipe's galvanized metal and cause major damage to your tankless water heater's internal components. More importantly, the venting must be gas tight to avoid carbon monoxide leakage. They must be gas tight because tankless heaters use a powered exhaust fan to push the exhaust gasses out, as opposed to tank water heaters which use a natural updraft. Be absolutely sure that you purchase Category III stainless steel (UL1738 certified) venting for your Gas-Fired Tankless Water Heater.

"Type B" venting accessories are never acceptable. Also, be sure to check local building codes to ensure that you are in compliance. Additionally, many Tankless Water Heater manufacturers offer gas venting "kits". Many of the modern tankless heaters use pipe specifically designed for use with each manufacturer's specific product. It is best to use only the manufacturer's recommended pipe. If their product uses special pipe, they will offer this as well. It is recommended that customers evaluate the needs of their specific installation to ensure that they will be getting all of the necessary gas venting accessories. Many tankless heaters have a maximum allowable vent pipe length and number of elbows (or bends), especially the direct vent models. Depending on where you will be installing the Tankless Water Heater, a pre-made kit will probably not meet your needs. Ensure that you measure out the vent route and consider where the discharge will go through the wall or ceiling, consider the necessary clearances, and consider ample access to air for combustion. At that time, buy the appropriate gas venting pieces. Electrical Note: Gas-Fired Tankless Water Heaters may still require an electrical connection. Always review all installation requirements on the heater you are considering.

Do I need to install a water softener for my tankless unit and how resistant is one of your tankless water heaters to hard water and sediment?

No. It is not required to install a water softener, but if you do live in an area that has very hard water it will eventually harm the performance of your tankless water heater. Something that we recommend that you do is to add a water filter which reduces scale which over long periods of time can form inside the heater's internal piping. A water softener system (non-reverse osmosis type) works well and many homes already have this.

Additionally, we recommend that you do a routine flush maintenance of your tankless heater. (frequency depends on your water hardness level) There are ways in which you can tell if you have hard water. You may contact your city's water department for their water test report, test your water by purchasing a water hardness kit (fairly inexpensive), or by simply looking at your water fixtures to see if you have mineral build-up. The bottom line is that hard water kills all water heaters. We advise anyone that owns any water heater to use a softener and/or filter to prolong the life of any water heater. Hard water prematurely damages and eventually ruins water heaters and appliances.

 

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Water heating system, tankless water heaters for residential and commercial uses.


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